Author Archive

Apartment Dwellers, A storage box tutorial with Sue Marsh

There is never a shortage of ideas! When the idea of a collaborative quilt was presented to me, it didn’t take long to dream up some characters to fit my imagination of who my neighbors might have been in my past apartment dwelling life.

If you’ve ever lived in apartment, you probably had one of these neighbors too.

All the fabrics shown are from my “Monster Trucks” line for RJR.

There are endless possibilities that you can do with my monster block, including room for exactly one cat.

You can find the pattern for the block and the Apartment Dwellers Storage Box on our website at www.wpcreek.com. Click on the “Free Patterns” button on left side, toward the bottom or click the link here.

Enjoy and Happy creating!

“WOOF”! A pillow-making tutorial with Leslie Tucker Jenison

“Hi! My name is Bizzi…”

If you have visited me before, either here or on FB or Instagram, you know about my little studio assistant. She is my little shadow and follows me everywhere I go. In my studio, she is a constant presence, even signaling me when enough is enough and it is time to stretch and play! She has several ways of doing this: the most amusing one being to pull a piece of fabric off my shelf and stand in front of me until I notice it….then she runs away shaking it vigorously! We refer to this as her “Schnauzer sense of humor”.

Since she is such a part of my studio life I opted to create my block for the RJR “Common Threads” quilt seen at Quilt Market 2016 using her likeness. This block is really fun to make and it is versatile. I will be creating a quilted pillow, but I think this block would be really fun as part of a tote, a mini-quilt, a panel on a jacket, and more. Plus, Bizzi loves the PR this project gives her and it elevates her social media status….

Here is the finished quilt using each of the RJR designers’ blocks.

Interesting how so many of us opted to include our pets!

Let’s get started, shall we? First, go to the RJR site to download the block template. Feel free to draw your own version of this block. Trust me, it is easy to do! Once you have the template you can choose the prints for each piece of the image. The fabrics must be pre-fused. I recommend fusing pieces of fabric prior to cutting the various shapes. Some of these pieces are small and it is much easier to handle the fusing, then fussy cut each shape. Ask me how I know…!

My choice of fusible is Mistyfuse. Why? Because it is so sheer that it does not change the hand of the cloth after the fusible is applied. This is important for useful items. Who wants a piece of cloth that becomes stiff as a board after fusing? Not me, that is for sure! When you use this product you will need either two Goddess Sheets (teflon pressing sheets) or two pieces of kitchen parchment paper: one to use under the project and one over the top to protect your iron and the ironing surface. Another VERY useful tool to have on hand is a cheap “scrubbie” (the cheap plastic ones used in the kitchen to clean pots and pans). I purchase a set of these rectangular scrubbies, sans sponge, and cut them into quarters for use in the studio. Once you have fused your fabric, allow a few seconds for the parchment or teflon sheet to cool off before peeling back the surface. After removing the fused fabric, quickly “scrub” the surface of both pressing sheets lightly to remove any hidden bits of the fusible that might have adhered to the surface. This prevents any stray bits from being accidentally fused on something else. I keep one at the edge of my work area and it is a habit to lightly scrub each surface that has had contact with the fused project. Remember: you are applying fusible to the WRONG side of the fabric!

For convenience I used a piece of notebook paper to cut a few of my pattern pieces, just to keep the size in perspective. Feel free to trace and cut every piece, but you may find that it isn’t necessary once you have the main pieces figured out. Here is a shape I used for the main part of her beard. I traced this onto the wrong (fused) size of the fabric, then cut. I later cut individual points at the lower part of her beard.

Here are here oversized eyebrows. I first cut the main shape, then clipped the smaller details at the base of the brows.

I selected the dark print to contrast with her brows and beard. Here is my template for the top of her head…

and here it is after cutting. I used the shredded print in charcoal to add another element on her face, a sort of “handlebar mustache”! I used the same dark charcoal from the “Box Springs” print for both top of head and the nose.

Paws: made from two oval shapes using charcoal Box Springs for the background, and the gray Linear Gradation print for the front of the paw (as used in the beard and brows).

Again, I first cut the basic shapes and then clipped the hair detail.

I chose the dark teal “Box Springs” for the base of the window sill, and the aqua “Vertical Garden” for the curtain shapes, and the Tiffany Box RJR Solid for the background. (Ignore the seam in the center of the solid: I simply pieced it together because I was running out!). All these fabrics, once pre-fused, were cut to the shapes of the template. Working over my parchment paper I placed everything before fusing.

I used the deep red Box Springs print for the background of my lettering and also the tie-backs for my curtains….

The overlay of my letters was cut from the “Curry” colored linear gradation on white. The main thing is to select prints that have a dark background and a contrasting lighter color on the letters. I cut the lighter pieces slightly smaller and offset them for visual interest. Note that I have another parchment sheet between my project and the iron! Important to do this to prevent any tiny bits of fusible from adhering to the iron surface!

Once the pieces have all been fused, trim the block to 8 1/2 inches square.

For the sides I selected the “Moss” colored “Linear Gradation” print. I like that this green picks up on the small elements of green in the other prints. I cut two 8.5″ by 5.5″ pieces to piece to each side.

Next, I cut two 18.5 by 5.5″ lengths of fabric. Piece one on top and bottom of image. Press.

Cut a 19.5″ piece of low-loft batting and backing (the choice of backing doesn’t matter as it will face inside the pillow. Pin fused/pieced project to the batting and backing. Quilt. I chose a matchstick quilting method and light-medium gray thread as I didn’t want to change thread colors at all. The gray works beautifully with all the colors in the prints, and basically disappears in the image….

Using my dual-feed attachment on my Bernina 770QE (or you may use a walking foot) I started in the center of my image and worked to each edge doing straight line quilting in rows approximately 1/8″ apart.

I used a stitch length of 2.25 and stepped over 2 stitches between rows.

Once the entire surface was quilted I trimmed the piece to 18″. Next, I cut two separate pieces of the deep red “Box Springs”, 18″ by 12″. I opted to stitch one of my selvedges to the section that will be outermost as I like the way it looks! For the second piece of the pillow back I folded the right side of the fabric twice, pressed, then stitched. This section will lay under the selvedge edge.

I plan for the selvedge to remain exposed on the finished pillow so I am careful to place my two back sections so that the selvedge finish is placed in the proper orientation to the dog face. This is the piece that should be positioned, front side facing down, against the quilted surface FIRST, then overlap the second piece so that the finished edge is facing in toward the center. Note: these pieces have a significant overlap so there is no need for a closure. Pin these in place around the edges. Stitch all the way around the perimeter allowing for the seam allowance. Back stitch two or three times at each corner as well as along the sides where the opening overlaps. These are areas that will have some stress applied to them when turning the project inside out, and also when stuffing the pillow insert, so the extra stitching prevents seam separation.

After stitching trim the corners diagonally to remove excess bulk.

Then, trim excess seam allowance about 1/8″ from seam for approximately 1.5″ from each direction of all 4 corners. This makes turning the project right-side-out much easier.

You may choose to push the corners with your finger or gently use the tip of a pair of scissors, just be careful not to poke all the way through!

Yay! I have a nice opening and I actually got the selvedge piece where I want it!

Now, at the ironing board, secure the seam edges by steam-pressing.

Lovely! I didn’t mention this earlier but before I started quilting I “fussy-cut” several elements from the prints and fused them onto the borders to add a bit more interest. This is optional, of course, but I think it adds a little something extra!

See the coneflower? I fused it in place before the quilting… as well as a few other floral elements seen in the border pieces.

This pillow is nice and squishy!

I think this cute pillow is “Bizzi-approved”!

Please let me see your projects when you finish them. I can’t wait to see what you make!

‘Dreaming of the Park’ Collaborative Quilt Block with Lynette Anderson

Last year I was invited by the other designers at RJR Fabrics to make a block for a collaborative quilt. We were asked to create a window scene for a city skyscraper – being a country girl it was hard for me to imagine what it might be like to live in an apartment in the city…..my furry friends shared their thoughts with me about how city life might be from their view on life ….. they told me they would spend their days ‘dreaming of the park’ and so my block had its name/theme and the drawing began!

The finished block was sent to RJR Fabrics, where it was joined with other designers ‘window’ scenes and made into this city quilt. I thought it was interesting that a number of us chose to make pet related window blocks 🙂

A second block was made and has been made into a pillow which looks perfect on the chair in my hallway, near where the dogs lead is kept. Its a constant reminder to me that my furry friends love to be outside – I don’t think they are capable of flying a kite but I bet they would love to try!

If your wondering what fabrics I used for my block, I predominately used fabrics from ‘High Meadow Farm‘ my new collection which is due in a quilt store near you soon….

I love how the selvage for High Meadow Farm turned out ‘oink oink’….

If you would like to make your own ‘dreaming of the park’ block then please follow this link to Download Dreaming of The Park templates.

The expression of Hugo my Labrador says it all….

What Shade are You with Carolyn Murfitt

Hello, I am Carolyn from Free Bird Quilting Designs and this is the second quilt I have been lucky enough to make for the ‘what shade are you’ blog hop!

My ‘what shade are you’ hasn’t changed, it stills every colour of the rainbow and what a rainbow it is with the cotton supreme solids!

I have had my heart set on making a flowering wreath quilt and with all of these colours to choose from it was the perfect opportunity.

These are the colors I chose for my flowering wreath:

Yellows/Oranges

Tourmaline, citron, sunny delight, golden topaz, carrot, cantaloupe, tangerine dream, oriole, butternut, ochre, mandarin

Reds/Pinks

Amaryllis, brick road, chilli pepper, scarlet letter, rio, pink sapphire, sunset ruby, rhododendron, red wagon

Purples

Raging ruby, amethyst, grape, hydrangea, purple haze, bougainvillea, aubergine, feeling blue, jacaranda

Blues/Turquoises

lapis lazuli, royal blue, carolina, lancaster sky, bora bora, turks and caicos, riviera, meadowland, night

Greens

toyboat, martini olive, sprout, aloe vera, emerald city, putting green, neon, clover, pea in a pod, grass is always greener.

I used a variety of the Quiltsmart interfacing and began by making my petals, flowers and leaves.

I experimented with a few different ideas but decided to lay them out in a rainbow pattern.

I kept adding flowers until I had the basic layout.

Once I had the petals positioned it was time to add the yellow centres.

Now that I was happy with the design it was time to load the quilt onto the longarm and begin quilting.

I chose a range of aurifil thread to match the colours of the petals.

Because the quilt was going to be quite detailed with the flowers, I didn’t want the background to compete.

The quilting I chose would add texture but would not draw the eye away from the wreath, which is the main focus of the quilt.

I wanted the quilting of the flowers, petals and leaves to be uniformed, so I chose a similar design in each one.

This would add to the flow of the quilt, so as not have one area or flower competing with another.

Here is a few pictures of the quilting in the flowers and petals.

The best part of quilting is taking the quilt off the longarm and seeing the quilting design for the first time as a whole. Making sure it meshes with the design of the quilt!

I was pretty happy with the result.

….. and finally the quilt has been bound and is finished!

and in the sunshine to show the quilting!

Thank you, thank you, thank you RJR Fabrics, you are a very generous company and I appreciate you giving me the opportunity to be part of your ‘what shade are you’ blog hop for the second time!

Demi and Rachael it has been an absolute pleasure corresponding with you over the course of these two quilts! Thank you!

Kyoto Fabric with Amy Barickman

Hi! I’m Amy Barickman, founder of Indygo Junction, and I’m so thrilled to introduce my new line of fabric, Kyoto. This collection is the third one from my Vintage Made Modern series. I am excited to share a little of the background behind my inspiration for this line. Check out the Kyoto video here.

My grandmother had a love for Japanese art that always inspired me as I grew up. My uncle and his wife were missionaries in Japan and my cousins grew up there. I am particularly drawn to the Japanese influence in clothing pattern designs. Asian graphics ideal for apparel sewing and quilting as the motifs are timeless. In selecting the prints for this collection, I made sure to select graphics that would work well for fashion like our new Indygo Essentials pattern line featuring simple, yet sophisticated silhouettes.

Contemporary Kimono

This pattern collection is a dressier kind of casual that embraces minimalism to create elegant, classic styles. Since the patterns are simple by design, it allows the beautifully saturated colors and interesting prints to shine.

Easy Top and Tunic

It’s beautiful in blue with the Boardwalk Dress! This would be a great Spring and Summer go-to and a fun way to pair your favorite prints from the fabric line!

Boardwalk Dress

We love this print in our Fabriflair line of dimensional English paper piecing kits as well. The Radiant Star features 60 pieces, so it’s a great way to showcase every print from this pattern. The Brio Sphere is a wonderful option if you’d like an extraordinarily beautiful way to display embroidery.

Completed Radiant Star

No hoops needed here, we have dimensional art for that! May we suggest fussy cutting some of those butterflies and embroidering them before you stitch them into a sphere? We loved that same embroidery idea shown here, in our Mad Money Mini bag,complete with hand-stitched butterfly love on the front.

Mad money mini

It’s sure to be a conversation piece and a wonderful way to showcase your love of needlecrafts. Or how about lining a Brio Sphere Bowl with the Kyoto Camelia in the Sky color.

Brio Sphere

The options are endless: Clothing and handbags too, as seen here with our Everyday Tank, and our Tribeca Tote.

Tribeca Tote and Everyday Tank

However you use it, we cannot wait to see! It is a gift to send fabric out into the world with RJR fabrics and see what magic all the creative people in our community create with it! Tag me on Instagram @amybarickman_studio when you sew with Kyoto so I can see!

Amy in the Essentials Shift Dress

Here’s me hanging out in my studio with one of my girls. I’m wearing our Indygo Essentials Shift Dress which is a favorite of mine, in the Arbor print in Poppy colorway and she’s wearing our Chic Cowl Neck Shift made with the Butterflies print in Poppy as well. You can see the Mad Money Mini bag in action too! If you’d like to see Kyoto sewn up in several different ways you can visit our Indygo Junction blog post, where we share lots of fun patterns in Kyoto!

FabriFlair with Amy Barickman

Have you seen Amy Barickman’s new Indygo Junction Fabriflair™ kits? These dimensional paper piecing projects are a perfect for sharing your favorite fabric collections. Check out this fun video that will tell you all about these material amusements created with needle and thread.

Watch the FabriFlair Video here:- https://youtu.be/0o-whHRDI2U

Fabriflair™ kits offer unique, clever, and practical projects to showcase favorite fabrics, embroidery and fiber art for quilters and sewers alike. There are currently six kits in the series to create stars, spheres, bowls, ornaments and a needle case.

The kit comes with pre-cut, rigid mat board templates that you cover with fabric and piece them together into decorative and functional forms. This is English paper piecing with a twist. It’s dimensional so no need to remove “papers” or “templates”. The kits were designed with pre-cuts in mind so they are perfect to pair with your favorite RJR collections – strips, squares or fat-quarter bundles. What a fun way to display all the beautiful coordinates in a collection!

Here is the Large Brio Sphere & Bowl kit created in Amy’s Vintage Made Modern – Stitcher’s Garden collection.

These kits look great in prints or solid. Here is the Large Radiant Star created in our RJR solids that was featured in the video above.

A perfect portable project for on-the-go! Personalize a Brio Sphere or Radiant Star with your team colors.

Ideal for gift giving! Pictured in solids with beaded embellishments. Also think Christmas ornaments as Fabriflair Trilliant Star is the perfect project to use treasured family fabrics .

Amy’s new line Vintage Made Modern – Kyoto is shown here in the Radiant Star and Brio Sphere.

Here is a Brio Sphere bowl in process. Note that Amy has fussy cut the interior shapes to repeat the pattern in the fabric.

Visit the Cotton + Steel blog post for more Fabriflair™ inspiration.

Visit IndygoJunction.com to purchase your favorite Fabriflair™ kit today! Use code FFSG5 to take 10% off your Fabriflair™ order! There is also a giveaway going on on the Indygo Junction blog, which you can check out here.

What Shade are You with Jen Van Orman

I am Jen Van Orman of @heritage.threads and I am so beyond excited to be sharing this quilt with you today. I was interested in quilting growing up as I saw my mother making quilts. I took a long hiatus from quilting until I was 8 months pregnant with my second child. Quilting has been my solace as I dealt with postpartum depression, toddler tantrums, and life in general. Creating something, anything, out of fabric really does soothe my soul.

When I had the opportunity to work with RJR’s cotton supreme solids I *maybe* cried just a little. I love, love solids and how much they can change a pattern into something completely different than intended. If you’ve ever worked with Cotton + Steel fabrics, these solids have the exact same hand and feel. They are such a dream to work with!!

I chose 25 colors to use in my quilt. It was really hard to just narrow it down to 25 from all of the beautiful options, but here they are:

Apricot Ice 387 Flamingo 338 Guava 373 Ballerina 176 Bubblegum 244 Hot Pink 217 Sweet Pea 420 Pink Sapphire 218 Rhododendron 181 Hydrangea 214 Violet 423 Bougainvillea 333 Aubergine 361 Perinwinkle 334 Harbor 280 Night 280 Sea Glass 234 Pistachio 404 Julep 403 Robin’s Egg 392 Turks & Caicos 292 Meadowland 352 Emerald City 329 Mermaid 393 Argento 362

I very loosely based my Confetti Bomb quilt off of a quilt I saw in Love Patchwork & Quilting November 2015 issue entitled “Snowfall” by Tied with a Ribbon. I took Jemima’s idea and it grew from there into this quilt.

I had quite a few moments of panic during the creative process, as I almost always do. My brain goes from “This is the best idea ever!” to “Oh my goodness! What was I thinking!” all within the space of fabric cutting to block assembly. I am hoping I’m not alone in this process. It is terrifying, and invigorating all at once.

Once I started laying out my blocks, I just had to let my plans for a specific layout all go out the window and let the fabric speak to me. In the end, I feel like this quilt ended up being better than I had originally hoped. In fact, it has propelled me to be more bold in my background choice for other quilts and push me further outside of my comfort zone. The quilting, done by Kaoline Parry @quilterlove66, really completed the look I was hoping for.

A big thank you to RJR fabrics for trusting me with your beautiful fabrics and to my husband and boys for being so patient as we paraded around town taking photos. The “Quilt with Love” slogan is alive and well in this quilt because of them.

What Shade are You with Lesley Storts

#WhatShadeAreYou – RJR Fabrics – Game Night Quilt by Lesley Storts

Even though my quilting experience goes back many years, my use of solid colored cotton for projects was limited until a couple of years ago. I caught glimpses of people’s quilts with solids and realized that I wanted to play! Several projects have been started, some completed, and then I was asked by RJR Fabrics if I would like to participate in their What Shade Are You Blog Hop. The answer was a resounding yes! I had already sketched out a project that I wanted to make with solids and after reviewing the abundant array of colors on RJR’s color card, I knew this project would have the variety needed to pull it off.

This is the list of fabrics I ended up using:

Cowboy 383
Chocolate 199
Marmalade 304
Custard 265
Martini Olive 343
Neon 348
Grove 407
Chalkboard 382
Silver 125
Golden Topaz 285
Chili Pepper 49
Tangerine Dream 276
Banana Cream Pie 336
Lucky Green 406
Turks & Caicos 292
Jacaranda 317
Goldenrod 92
Electric Blue 296
Scarlet Letter 325
Aloe Vera 349
Rhododendron 181
Lake 427
Orange Crush 372

In answering the question, What Shade Are You?, my answer is that I am shade competitive…but just a shade. My solid fabric quilts have ended up being stories about my life and experiences. This quilt is no different and reminds me of happy times in life. My mom taught me to play backgammon and Chinese checkers when I was a kid and my aunt and uncle taught me how to play Othello (yes, that’s Othello in the bottom right corner). We played these games often. Just a quick round or two but mostly 3 because we wanted to see who won the best 2 out of 3. Growing up, I played cards with girlfriends at camp, at sleepovers, or solitaire by myself. When I was dating my husband, I was introduced to Euchre. It’s against the rules to live in Ohio and not know how to play this game. At least that’s what I was told when we moved here and I was just compliant and learned – haha! Our family and friends play all kinds of games on a regular basis when we socialize.

My quilt, Game Night, originated from these happy times. Backgammon was made from a foundation paper piece template that I created. Top right is the traditional block, card trick. Chinese checkers is based on the Star of Bethlehem block and I created a foundation paper piece template for the triangles. Othello is a classic checker board pattern.

RJR’s Cotton Supreme Solids are fantastic for many reasons. As mentioned before, the color choices are exceptional and just as vibrant in person as they are in the pictures. The weight of fabric and how it lays makes it so easy to quilt. There is minimal fraying or stretching. Using RJR’s solids for this project was exactly what I needed.

Last year, a quilt friend of mine showed a “potholder” quilt at guild. I was intrigued. Potholder quilts date from the US American Civil War and were created from individual blocks that are completely finished and bound then stitched together. I had wanted to try this technique and this project was ideal.

Constructing the quilts was fun and sometimes challenging, but the quilting was the best part! I tried hard to elicit the feel of the different games through the quilting. Both backgammon and Othello have fairly minimalist game boards so there are a lot of straight lines.

Chinese checkers is round! I was thinking and talking about how I could make the circular game board work and my daughter suggested quilting it in. Creating an image with the thread was especially satisfying.

When I think of traditional playing cards, I think of the swirling designs on the card backs and tried to replicate that with free motion quilting.

The fabric is so vibrant it almost looks electric! The only rule for picking the back was that it be bright and fun. I love the way that RJR’s solid fabric showcases the quilting.

Are you ready to have fun playing with RJR’s Cotton Supreme Solids? Head on over to Instagram and find @rjrfabrics or me @lesleystorts for details about a giveaway with all of the colors I used to create Game Night. You can also find me on my blog at StortsMarket.com.

Happy Quilting ▶︎ ▶︎ ▶︎

What Shade are You with Friederike Stanke

I’m so thrilled to have been given the opportunity to sew a quilt with RJR’s beautiful solids. I’ve been sewing (more or less) my whole life, but only started to seriously dive into the world of (modern) quilting and the Instagram community in 2013 (I’m @piecestopatch over there). Solids are what I’m always drawn to, because I just love the simplicity, while they also offer endless possibilities to change patterns. When I was asked by RJR to participate in the Blog Hop, I immediately thought of Inaluxe designs I had just seen in the German issue of Flow Magazine. So while I would have loved to just turn one of their designs into a quilt, I took a step back and just let the inspiration flow. Once the colors were set and I also knew that I wanted to sew something with curves, I tried out different design ideas.

While I still love these designs, I think the circles needed to be smaller for it to really work. Another WIP on the list 😉 So back to basics: Circles. And while I’m usually an all-white background kind-a-gal, I stepped outside my comfort zone and used colored background fabrics. But then the next decision snuck up on me: how to quilt this beauty? And again, I had ideas that I loved in theory, but just couldn’t get myself to quilt on my domestic machine.

And again, back to basics (notice a theme here?!): Circles. I was unsure if it was too simple to quilt circles with just circles but you don’t know until you try, right? So here it is, in all its glory: circles on circles in the most beautiful spring bloom colors.

The pictures were taken in the gardens of Schwetzingen Castle. I could have taken a million pictures and will definitely go back there for the next quilty photo session. So many great angels, buildings and photo props.

The binding is very scrappy, but I think it worked out great for the overall design.

And just one last shout out to the best husband and friends in the world, who endured -7°C with a baby and a toddler (who cried for two hours straight), just so I could get the perfect picture. THANK YOU!

This is the list of fabrics I ended up using:

Beach House 242
Blue Skies 264
Bordeaux 82
Canvas 150
Chartreuse 284
Cove 294
Fairy Princess 237
Goldilocks 368
Hedge 247
Mahana Beach 229
Moonlight 365
Notting Hill 309
Oriole 314
Pea in a Pod 359
Peridot 342
Rhododendron 181
Ginko 303
Rio 311
Seafoam 301
Silver 125
Sunny Delight 326
Tickled Pink 330

Thank you RJR for giving me the opportunity to sew with your fabrics. They were a dream to work with, minimal fraying, very smooth and beautiful saturated colors.

What Shade are You with Nikki Clark Murray

Hello everyone! I’m Nikki Clark Murray aka @babylovequilts on Instagram. I am a avid sewer of quilts, blankets, and baby accessories and I am so happy to be sharing my latest quilt design with you all. When RJR Fabrics asked me to be a part of this blog hop, I was so excited I screamed a little, which was then followed by lots and lots of dancing.

I have been designing my own quilts for several years now, and I knew from the start of this project that I was going to design something brand spanking new for it. I had so many designs floating around in my head, I knew it was going to be hard to pick just one.

The inspiration for the quilt came to me one day while I was on a walk with my kids. I saw the quote “be the rainbow in someone’s cloud” earlier that day and thought… How can I make that into a quilt? Naturally the quilt had to be a burst of color, seeing as its a rainbow, so I opened up the color card and started planning. 34 colors later, this is what I chose for the quilt top…

Redwork
Moulin Rouge
Chili Pepper
Bandana
Beach Coral
Mandarin
Tangerine Dream
Carrot
Sunny Side Up
Sunny Delight
Lemon Chiffon
Custard
Sprout
Sour Apple
Clover
Kelly Green
Shamrock
Twilight
Horizon
Turks and Caicos
Electric Blue
Lapis Lazuli
Caviar
Hydrangea
Jacaranda
Amethyst
Grape
Argento
Overcast
Grey Stone
Celeste
Pewter
Kerchief

For the backing I chose the Cotton + Steel’s Printshop Starry in Seaglass as I thought it went well with the theme of the quilts, plus that print is just super adorable.

In the end, the quilt turned out to be more beautiful than I thought. It measures at 60×72 and consists of 270 half square triangles.

After I was done taking pictures of the quilt, I realized that this will be the first quilt, in a long time, that I actually get to keep for myself! I haven’t been able to do some selfish sewing in a very long time, and when I do, I never get to fully finish it (you should see my UFO pile, its HUGE). So thank you RJR Fabrics for asking me to make a quilt using their amazing Cotton Supreme Solids, they are truly wonderful to work with and for allowing me to finish a project that turned out truly amazing.

Be sure to stop by @rjrfabrics and my page @babylovequilts, as there will be an amazing giveaway. Trust me its something you dont want to miss out on.