Thimbleberries Quilts with a New Attitude by Lynette Jensen

A good quilt design can really work in any fabric, whether traditional or modern. Thimbleberries patterns have always been the “go to” for teaching new quilters. Showing the quilts made in a variety of fabric collections helps everyone imagine the possibilities. In Thimbleberries Quilts with a New Attitude, Lynette Jensen shows just how different a quilt can look simply by “flipping” your fabric choices, from traditional to the bright, exploding colors of the modern aesthetic.

Her new book published by Landauer Publishing is packed full of amazing projects, 23 in all! The patterns are all written in Thimbleberries style with easy to follow instructions and color diagrams.

Throughout the book, each quilt was made using vastly different fabrics. In some cases the same block was used but half sized.

In some cases, the same blocks were used but sashing and borders were eliminated and in many cases an alternate size quilt dimension was the result. A touch of appliqué now and then also changed the flavor of the quilt.

Take a look at Garden Inspiration featuring Garden Collage by Lynette Jensen and My Blue Heaven featuring Cotton + Steel’s Bluebird. The projects are the same, but look completely different. The result is surprising. Isn’t it? If you haven’t tried fabrics outside your comfort zone, perhaps this will inspire you to take a leap!

Shares Lynette, “I am convinced that a good quilt design works for both traditional and modern fabrics. This is the perfect opportunity for quilters whose fabric preferences differ to learn from each other. The best part of quilting has always been the tradition of passing on the joy of making a quilt with another generation of quilters.”

Lynette Jensen’s new book, Quilts with a New Attitude has arrived and is available from Landauer Publishing and hopefully at your local quilt shop.

Common Threads quilt block with Jamie Fingal

The Common Threads quilt at Fall Quilt Market. Each designer was asked to design a 8×8 square in their signature style with their fabric line. Since my line wasn’t available yet, I used some fun dots and stripes for my window.

Here is my little window. This was designed by my daughter who just whipped it up in no time. Our dog, a crown (because he is king), and cup of coffee (our fav drink), a bird (for Linda) and a pink donut (we love donuts).

Now for the exciting part! My fabric has arrived for me to start making projects. So, my first order of business was to make a mini quilt 12×12. I use wool blended felt on the inside of my quilts, instead of batting. I am cutting the felt 12×12 for my project.

All of my fabrics have been pre-fused with Mistyfuse. This is the way that I make all of my quilts. I selected my background fabric and placed it over the felt. Flipping it up, you can see a sheen on the fabric – that is the Mistyfuse.

Pressing it into place with my dry iron (Bess) on the cotton setting. I run the iron over the top in a circular motion making sure that I include the edges.

In order to cut off the parts that are hanging over the edge, I flip the felt over and cut from the back, using the felt as my guide. You could also use a rotary cutter to do this too. Sometimes for me, it is easier to just use a pair of sharp scissors.

Now we are at the design phase. A quick drawing of the square that I will use as my guide to fussy cut the objects.

Fabric for the dog. Thinking about how to start.

I just started cutting. The ears and neck are separate, and easy to put together with the dog head.

Okay, then comes scale. Is the dog head too small? Too large? From where I sit it looks fine…

Now if you put all of the pieces together, the dog head is much too large. I decide to not start over because I don’t want to waste the fabric. So, I cut it down the size where all of the objects fit together. It took a couple of tweaks here and there.

Adding the donut, which is also fussy cut. When cutting out a donut, the easiest way to cut the hole is to fold the circle in half and then cut a half circle. Easy peasy.

I want to add some features to the dog head, so I am using a Pentel Gel Roller for fabric. It goes on like butter and is permanent.

Here is my sketch with my design. Happy camper here!

These are the fabrics that I used in my mini quilt from my new hopscotch line of blenders!

And hopscotch was his name-O with binding!

What Shade are You with Debbie Jeske

Hello! My name is Debbie Jeske, and I’m happy to be sharing my latest quilt with you! You can see more of my work on my blog, A Quilter’s Table, on Instagram (@aquilterstable), and on Facebook. I also publish a twice-monthly newsletter, The Scrap Basket, where I especially enjoy highlighting the work of others and sharing links to all sorts of current crafty goodness.



When I was asked by RJR Fabrics to participate in their What Shade are You? blog hop, you totally would have thought I would have said “green” or at least “green and blue!” But on the particular day I had to give a definitive answer, I was feeling very teal and gold and gray.



Now, I had seen many participants choose bundles that were large and colorful, yet when it came right down to it, I chose just six colors. RJR’s Demi, who first approached me about participating in the blog hop, really loved the improv pineapple blocks I’d included in my Seattle MQG SeaSLAB BOM, so all along I was planning to create something with pineapple blocks, and I didn’t want to lose the design in too much color, if that was even possible. 


The Cotton Supreme Solids I finally chose were:
Argento 362 (Background)
Riviera 274, Turks & Calicos 292, Horizon 354 (Mains)
Goldilocks 368, Silver 125 (Contasts)



Wanting my quilt design to be relatively easy to recreate if one chose, I made three sizes of blocks – 20″ square, 10″ x 20″, and 10″ square. Thus they were easily arranged in an orderly way, while still giving the quilt a very improvisational look and feel.



If you’ve never made improv pineapple blocks, check out the MQG blog. There you’ll find technique tutorials for whole pineapple blocks as well as the “half log cabin” version I used.



For quilting, I chose four Aurifil 50wt threads to quilt a design inspired by Jacquie Gering‘s “Fancy Straight Line” found in her WALK book. I used #2600 (light gray) and #5006 (light turquoise) for the straight vertical lines, then #2810 (turquoise) and #2975 (brass) for the intermittent zig zags. 




I really love how this quilting design adds to the wonky shapes of the quilt itself without overwhelming it.



The finished quilt, measuring 60″ square, was bound in two shade of teal, using what I had left from my bundle.

 

Thanks much to RJR Fabrics (@rjrfabrics/#rjrfabrics) for including me in the #whatshadeareyou blog hop! I had great fun playing with their #cottonsupremesolids, that’s for sure! The fabric has a lovely hand and such clear colors – a perfect way to #quiltwithlove.



What Shade are You with Colby Radcliffe

‘Blossom’

Hi everyone, I’m Colby, also known as @theauthenticstitch on Instagram.

I’ve been sewing since I was child, but I’ve only been quilting since mid 2015.

What shade am I? Simply put, I’m every shade. I love colour, and I’m in my element when I’m playing and creating with it. I’ve found that quilting has been a perfect way to combine both my background in Visual Arts and my sewing passion. I haven’t been drawn to solids previously, I love my prints, so I was so excited to create something that made the solids really shine. I knew as soon as I was approached by RJR that I was going to create something of my own design and that it would be using bias appliqué… on steroids. You may have seen my baskets previously, but they have nothing on this quilt! Then the colour card arrived and I was in heaven. All the possibilities, all those delicious colours.

In the end the Cotton Supreme Solid colors I chose for my quilt top are:

BEACH CORAL 355
GRAY STONE 155
TOYBOAT 366
MEADOWLAND 352
PERIDOT 342
HARLEQUIN 358
CHARLOTTE 226
PINK ORCHID 331
BOUGAINVILLEA 333
PURPLE HAZE 279
RIVIERA 274
TURKS & CAICOS 292
HORIZON 354
ARGENTO 362
PEWTER 351

And I couldn’t resist to add some cotton + steel prints:

C&S – RAINDROP, PRECIPITATION PISTACHIO 1939-02
C&S – BASICS , SPRINKLE STARDUST 5023-08

I sketched my original mandala on paper, and then adapted the design so my bias binding applique would work on it. When it was time to transfer the design across into the fabric medium, I upscaled the pattern and sectioned it into 6ths so I could just repeat the 1 section as it was rotated around. I transferred the design onto the fabric using a water soluble maker so I could easily remove any markings once they were no longer required.

I had already planned my colour layout out in the original design process, so it was just a matter of transferring my pattern pieces onto the fabric and fusing to make the raw edge appliqué pieces. Once the pieces were all cut they were then pressed onto the quilt top background in the proper place!

Making the 1/4″ bias strips was made a lot easier with my bias machine and each strip was cut at 5/8″ to make a nice even bias. Each strip is carefully planned in order of application because strips are layered over the top of others. It started getting very exciting as I got towards the end of this part of the process, the quilt was really starting to take shape!

Next came the quilting. I chose Cotton and Steel Precipitation in Pistachio from Rashida Coleman-Hale’s Raindrop as the backing and used a cotton/poly batting. Wrestling with this beauty on a domestic machine was a challenge (it’s 60” square) but I started free motion quilting from the centre and worked my way out. I wanted to keep the central quilting quite simplistic so I didn’t take away from the main design, so I bordered the mandala with straight echo quilting, and threw in some pebbling around the fused pieces to keep the focus on the solids.

And finally the quilt was bound in Cotton and Steel Basic Sprinkle in Stardust, creating a frame for the quilt that varied ever so slightly from the bias appliqué and the background.

And then ‘Blossom’ was finished!

What Shade are You with Marion McClellan

Hey y’all! My name is Marion McClellan, and I am pleased as punch (pink and orange punch) to be here with you today! (You can find me on Instagram @myquiltdiet and on my blog myquiltdiet.blogspot.com.)

So, What Shade Are You?

At different times in my life, I would answer that question differently, as I am sure you would too, although, pink would always be at least one of the shades in my answer.

Yes, I totally would have driven this car in high school!.. and today.

Pink has always been one of my “signature colors.” (“Blush and bashful, one is much deeper than the other!”) …well, maybe green was my actual first love, truth be told. Now wait, or did I pick green because my best friend had already chosen blue and we couldn’t have the same “favorite” color??? Oh no! What if the foundation for all of my future color choices was based on my off picking first and I had to take sloppy seconds??!

[I’m sorry. I digress.]

So, a while back RJR Fabrics contacted me about participating in their “What Shade Are You” Blog Hop. HOW EXCITING!! The cool kids want me to play with them!

RJR sent me the color card for their AMAZING Cotton Supreme colors. Talk about heaven on card stock! Luscious!!

[Now, I do need to go back a little in time for this part of the story. My quilts usually don’t have such a long story, but making this quilt was a bit of an Odyssey :)]

A few years ago, I was asked to judge a local quilt show. The lady who was in charge of the show met us there and was binding a quilt while we judged the show, an AMAZING antique quilt. Let’s just say I DIED over this quilt. I had never seen the pattern before and I swooned!

(I tried to run off with the quilt while she wasn’t looking, but this lady was too quick for me).

She did let me take a picture of it instead.

Orange gingham and a pale pink background. An obsession was born. Not only was I now obsessed with this quilt design, but my mind was blown by the color combination. (Is there a “mind blown” emoji?). Obsession at first sight! Orange and pink, who knew??

[Fast forward a few months to Quilt Market spring 2016]

As I was wandering around quilt market, I stopped into the AWESOME AND AMAZING Sew Kind of Wonderful booth. (Love you gals!). I showed Jenny the pic of the antique quilt on my phone and asked if she knew what it was. She told me that it was a traditional drunkard’s path and that I would have the best luck recreating the blocks with their awesome Mini Quick Curve Ruler. (Their rulers ROCKS!)

[Of course, I bought the ruler and skipped merrily on my way. A little foreshadowing, I also bought a fat quarter bundle of the new Cotton + Steel Checkers…]

Now to choose fabric. Enter RJR’s invitation to participate in WSAY. Enter divine intervention.

Anyone who has worked with solids knows that it is sometimes easier to choose solids using a print fabric for inspiration. Find a fabric you love for the backing first, and then select your solids to match. It’s a little backwards from what we are used to, but it really, REALLY helps! (You’re welcome! …I actually got this BRILLIANT tip from Kira Carter, you can thank her over on ig @quiltedkira )

Well, as fate would have it, I was scrolling through my ig feed and suddenly the heavens parted and angels began to sing(!) as I saw the most glorious BEAUTIFUL fabric in the WHOLE WORLD! [I’m not. even. kidding.]

Lo and behold, right there in the middle of a fabric collage was the most perfect fabric ever designed in all of fabric-dom. Right there in my ig feed was floral fabric nirvana! Pink and orange fabric perfection.

You are probably wondering who the designer of this holy grail of fabric was? Well, of course it was the Queen of Design, none other than Ms. Jennifer Paganelli, her royalness, of the most high.

Are you ready for the conflict? The the most perfect fabric of all time was out of print!! NOOOOoooooooo… Several years out of print and nowhere to be found!

So what did I do?? (…after I cried face down on the floor for a day?) I posted an ISO on IG and crossed my fingers. Yet again, the quilting ancestors interceded and a few WONDERFUL and glorious IG bffs found me yardage of this out of print loveliness. My life was now complete.

With my RJR Cotton Supreme color card in one hand and the floral in the other, I chose three of the most lovely shades of pink (ballerina, fairy princess, & orchid) and one outstanding shade of orange (carrot). Cute names, right? …RJR really should name two, Blush and Bashful! 😉

Now for the work to begin.

It took a bit of finagling, and a few (hundred) test blocks, but I finally found the right proportions for my traditional drunkards path block.

I wanted the quilt to have movement, and that is why I chose three slightly different shades of pink for the quilt.

Please excuse the night time design wall photo!

I am SO happy with the result.

As I am a longarm quilter, the quilting was the most bestest funnest part of the whole project. In working with solids, the quilting really stands out and shows itself off to the world.

I thought long and hard about how I would quilt this traditional design. I finally settled on stitch in the ditch, a crosshatch quilting for the orange, and an outline and swirl-pebble motif for the pink. For the curves and straight lines I use Linda Hrcka’s Quilted Pineapple Curved Templates and the QP Edge. They pretty much rock!

PS- I always use Superior Threads “So Fine” thread when I quilt. It’s the BOMB!

How would I bat the quilt? I know most people don’t give this aspect much thought, but I like to obsess over it.

I (almost) always start with Winline Textiles 100% natural cotton batting. It’s my favorite, hands down. The next really important question is, “do I add a layer of Quilters Dream, Dream Wool on top of the cotton?” The question was answered with an emphatic, “YES!”

Double batting adds to the quilts weight and warmth as well as making the quilting look AWESOME!! I love how the wool gives the quilting the extra “wow” factor, something every longarm quilter is looking for.

(Yes, I did mark my crosshatch. I used a water soluble marker.)

I was hoping to complete the quilting in a few days, and thankfully, I was able to do that. (ALL of my boys went camping and left me alone to my own quilty devices! )

Now for the binding. Binding is quite a bit more important than some may think. It frames the quilt…and I LOVE to hand bind! 🙂

Bias gingham is my first and forever choice for binding, as it should be. Bias gingham binding is the most perfect choice (almost) always. The end, and amen. (Ok, ok, I do have a pretty serious relationship going with a bolt of black and white stripe that ends up as binding for quite a few of my quilts 😀 …but gingham is right up there!)

If you have ever worked with pinks and orange, there are about a million shades and hues to choose from. Matching them can be a real challenge. “Is the pink too blue, is the orange too red or yellow?” Decisions, decisions!

THANK HEAVENS!!, the new Cotton + Steel woven checkers in lavender was the perfect match.

Well, regardless of the name, the Cotton + Steel checkers was perfection in binding form.

Is there anything prettier than a pile of prepped binding on the floor next to your sewing machine?

Any hoots, the binding went on like a dream. I (almost) always hand bind my quilts. I love the look, but mostly love the time I get to spend with my quilt, hand stitching (and binge watching something on Netflix or Hulu.)

I am so happy with how this quilt turned out.

Here’s hoping that in 100 years, this quilt will inspire another lovely creation by some future quilter!

(There is always that one stupid corner where a seam ends up! Aye crumb!)

Name: Drunkard’s Sunrise

Finished quilt size- 56”x72”

Thank you, RJR Fabrics, for inviting me to participate in such a fun adventure! Who knew the amazing places this journey would take me!!

Apartment Dwellers, A storage box tutorial with Sue Marsh

There is never a shortage of ideas! When the idea of a collaborative quilt was presented to me, it didn’t take long to dream up some characters to fit my imagination of who my neighbors might have been in my past apartment dwelling life.

If you’ve ever lived in apartment, you probably had one of these neighbors too.

All the fabrics shown are from my “Monster Trucks” line for RJR.

There are endless possibilities that you can do with my monster block, including room for exactly one cat.

You can find the pattern for the block and the Apartment Dwellers Storage Box on our website at www.wpcreek.com. Click on the “Free Patterns” button on left side, toward the bottom or click the link here.

Enjoy and Happy creating!

“WOOF”! A pillow-making tutorial with Leslie Tucker Jenison

“Hi! My name is Bizzi…”

If you have visited me before, either here or on FB or Instagram, you know about my little studio assistant. She is my little shadow and follows me everywhere I go. In my studio, she is a constant presence, even signaling me when enough is enough and it is time to stretch and play! She has several ways of doing this: the most amusing one being to pull a piece of fabric off my shelf and stand in front of me until I notice it….then she runs away shaking it vigorously! We refer to this as her “Schnauzer sense of humor”.

Since she is such a part of my studio life I opted to create my block for the RJR “Common Threads” quilt seen at Quilt Market 2016 using her likeness. This block is really fun to make and it is versatile. I will be creating a quilted pillow, but I think this block would be really fun as part of a tote, a mini-quilt, a panel on a jacket, and more. Plus, Bizzi loves the PR this project gives her and it elevates her social media status….

Here is the finished quilt using each of the RJR designers’ blocks.

Interesting how so many of us opted to include our pets!

Let’s get started, shall we? First, go to the RJR site to download the block template. Feel free to draw your own version of this block. Trust me, it is easy to do! Once you have the template you can choose the prints for each piece of the image. The fabrics must be pre-fused. I recommend fusing pieces of fabric prior to cutting the various shapes. Some of these pieces are small and it is much easier to handle the fusing, then fussy cut each shape. Ask me how I know…!

My choice of fusible is Mistyfuse. Why? Because it is so sheer that it does not change the hand of the cloth after the fusible is applied. This is important for useful items. Who wants a piece of cloth that becomes stiff as a board after fusing? Not me, that is for sure! When you use this product you will need either two Goddess Sheets (teflon pressing sheets) or two pieces of kitchen parchment paper: one to use under the project and one over the top to protect your iron and the ironing surface. Another VERY useful tool to have on hand is a cheap “scrubbie” (the cheap plastic ones used in the kitchen to clean pots and pans). I purchase a set of these rectangular scrubbies, sans sponge, and cut them into quarters for use in the studio. Once you have fused your fabric, allow a few seconds for the parchment or teflon sheet to cool off before peeling back the surface. After removing the fused fabric, quickly “scrub” the surface of both pressing sheets lightly to remove any hidden bits of the fusible that might have adhered to the surface. This prevents any stray bits from being accidentally fused on something else. I keep one at the edge of my work area and it is a habit to lightly scrub each surface that has had contact with the fused project. Remember: you are applying fusible to the WRONG side of the fabric!

For convenience I used a piece of notebook paper to cut a few of my pattern pieces, just to keep the size in perspective. Feel free to trace and cut every piece, but you may find that it isn’t necessary once you have the main pieces figured out. Here is a shape I used for the main part of her beard. I traced this onto the wrong (fused) size of the fabric, then cut. I later cut individual points at the lower part of her beard.

Here are here oversized eyebrows. I first cut the main shape, then clipped the smaller details at the base of the brows.

I selected the dark print to contrast with her brows and beard. Here is my template for the top of her head…

and here it is after cutting. I used the shredded print in charcoal to add another element on her face, a sort of “handlebar mustache”! I used the same dark charcoal from the “Box Springs” print for both top of head and the nose.

Paws: made from two oval shapes using charcoal Box Springs for the background, and the gray Linear Gradation print for the front of the paw (as used in the beard and brows).

Again, I first cut the basic shapes and then clipped the hair detail.

I chose the dark teal “Box Springs” for the base of the window sill, and the aqua “Vertical Garden” for the curtain shapes, and the Tiffany Box RJR Solid for the background. (Ignore the seam in the center of the solid: I simply pieced it together because I was running out!). All these fabrics, once pre-fused, were cut to the shapes of the template. Working over my parchment paper I placed everything before fusing.

I used the deep red Box Springs print for the background of my lettering and also the tie-backs for my curtains….

The overlay of my letters was cut from the “Curry” colored linear gradation on white. The main thing is to select prints that have a dark background and a contrasting lighter color on the letters. I cut the lighter pieces slightly smaller and offset them for visual interest. Note that I have another parchment sheet between my project and the iron! Important to do this to prevent any tiny bits of fusible from adhering to the iron surface!

Once the pieces have all been fused, trim the block to 8 1/2 inches square.

For the sides I selected the “Moss” colored “Linear Gradation” print. I like that this green picks up on the small elements of green in the other prints. I cut two 8.5″ by 5.5″ pieces to piece to each side.

Next, I cut two 18.5 by 5.5″ lengths of fabric. Piece one on top and bottom of image. Press.

Cut a 19.5″ piece of low-loft batting and backing (the choice of backing doesn’t matter as it will face inside the pillow. Pin fused/pieced project to the batting and backing. Quilt. I chose a matchstick quilting method and light-medium gray thread as I didn’t want to change thread colors at all. The gray works beautifully with all the colors in the prints, and basically disappears in the image….

Using my dual-feed attachment on my Bernina 770QE (or you may use a walking foot) I started in the center of my image and worked to each edge doing straight line quilting in rows approximately 1/8″ apart.

I used a stitch length of 2.25 and stepped over 2 stitches between rows.

Once the entire surface was quilted I trimmed the piece to 18″. Next, I cut two separate pieces of the deep red “Box Springs”, 18″ by 12″. I opted to stitch one of my selvedges to the section that will be outermost as I like the way it looks! For the second piece of the pillow back I folded the right side of the fabric twice, pressed, then stitched. This section will lay under the selvedge edge.

I plan for the selvedge to remain exposed on the finished pillow so I am careful to place my two back sections so that the selvedge finish is placed in the proper orientation to the dog face. This is the piece that should be positioned, front side facing down, against the quilted surface FIRST, then overlap the second piece so that the finished edge is facing in toward the center. Note: these pieces have a significant overlap so there is no need for a closure. Pin these in place around the edges. Stitch all the way around the perimeter allowing for the seam allowance. Back stitch two or three times at each corner as well as along the sides where the opening overlaps. These are areas that will have some stress applied to them when turning the project inside out, and also when stuffing the pillow insert, so the extra stitching prevents seam separation.

After stitching trim the corners diagonally to remove excess bulk.

Then, trim excess seam allowance about 1/8″ from seam for approximately 1.5″ from each direction of all 4 corners. This makes turning the project right-side-out much easier.

You may choose to push the corners with your finger or gently use the tip of a pair of scissors, just be careful not to poke all the way through!

Yay! I have a nice opening and I actually got the selvedge piece where I want it!

Now, at the ironing board, secure the seam edges by steam-pressing.

Lovely! I didn’t mention this earlier but before I started quilting I “fussy-cut” several elements from the prints and fused them onto the borders to add a bit more interest. This is optional, of course, but I think it adds a little something extra!

See the coneflower? I fused it in place before the quilting… as well as a few other floral elements seen in the border pieces.

This pillow is nice and squishy!

I think this cute pillow is “Bizzi-approved”!

Please let me see your projects when you finish them. I can’t wait to see what you make!

‘Dreaming of the Park’ Collaborative Quilt Block with Lynette Anderson

Last year I was invited by the other designers at RJR Fabrics to make a block for a collaborative quilt. We were asked to create a window scene for a city skyscraper – being a country girl it was hard for me to imagine what it might be like to live in an apartment in the city…..my furry friends shared their thoughts with me about how city life might be from their view on life ….. they told me they would spend their days ‘dreaming of the park’ and so my block had its name/theme and the drawing began!

The finished block was sent to RJR Fabrics, where it was joined with other designers ‘window’ scenes and made into this city quilt. I thought it was interesting that a number of us chose to make pet related window blocks 🙂

A second block was made and has been made into a pillow which looks perfect on the chair in my hallway, near where the dogs lead is kept. Its a constant reminder to me that my furry friends love to be outside – I don’t think they are capable of flying a kite but I bet they would love to try!

If your wondering what fabrics I used for my block, I predominately used fabrics from ‘High Meadow Farm‘ my new collection which is due in a quilt store near you soon….

I love how the selvage for High Meadow Farm turned out ‘oink oink’….

If you would like to make your own ‘dreaming of the park’ block then please follow this link to Download Dreaming of The Park templates.

The expression of Hugo my Labrador says it all….

What Shade are You with Carolyn Murfitt

Hello, I am Carolyn from Free Bird Quilting Designs and this is the second quilt I have been lucky enough to make for the ‘what shade are you’ blog hop!

My ‘what shade are you’ hasn’t changed, it stills every colour of the rainbow and what a rainbow it is with the cotton supreme solids!

I have had my heart set on making a flowering wreath quilt and with all of these colours to choose from it was the perfect opportunity.

These are the colors I chose for my flowering wreath:

Yellows/Oranges

Tourmaline, citron, sunny delight, golden topaz, carrot, cantaloupe, tangerine dream, oriole, butternut, ochre, mandarin

Reds/Pinks

Amaryllis, brick road, chilli pepper, scarlet letter, rio, pink sapphire, sunset ruby, rhododendron, red wagon

Purples

Raging ruby, amethyst, grape, hydrangea, purple haze, bougainvillea, aubergine, feeling blue, jacaranda

Blues/Turquoises

lapis lazuli, royal blue, carolina, lancaster sky, bora bora, turks and caicos, riviera, meadowland, night

Greens

toyboat, martini olive, sprout, aloe vera, emerald city, putting green, neon, clover, pea in a pod, grass is always greener.

I used a variety of the Quiltsmart interfacing and began by making my petals, flowers and leaves.

I experimented with a few different ideas but decided to lay them out in a rainbow pattern.

I kept adding flowers until I had the basic layout.

Once I had the petals positioned it was time to add the yellow centres.

Now that I was happy with the design it was time to load the quilt onto the longarm and begin quilting.

I chose a range of aurifil thread to match the colours of the petals.

Because the quilt was going to be quite detailed with the flowers, I didn’t want the background to compete.

The quilting I chose would add texture but would not draw the eye away from the wreath, which is the main focus of the quilt.

I wanted the quilting of the flowers, petals and leaves to be uniformed, so I chose a similar design in each one.

This would add to the flow of the quilt, so as not have one area or flower competing with another.

Here is a few pictures of the quilting in the flowers and petals.

The best part of quilting is taking the quilt off the longarm and seeing the quilting design for the first time as a whole. Making sure it meshes with the design of the quilt!

I was pretty happy with the result.

….. and finally the quilt has been bound and is finished!

and in the sunshine to show the quilting!

Thank you, thank you, thank you RJR Fabrics, you are a very generous company and I appreciate you giving me the opportunity to be part of your ‘what shade are you’ blog hop for the second time!

Demi and Rachael it has been an absolute pleasure corresponding with you over the course of these two quilts! Thank you!

Kyoto Fabric with Amy Barickman

Hi! I’m Amy Barickman, founder of Indygo Junction, and I’m so thrilled to introduce my new line of fabric, Kyoto. This collection is the third one from my Vintage Made Modern series. I am excited to share a little of the background behind my inspiration for this line. Check out the Kyoto video here.

My grandmother had a love for Japanese art that always inspired me as I grew up. My uncle and his wife were missionaries in Japan and my cousins grew up there. I am particularly drawn to the Japanese influence in clothing pattern designs. Asian graphics ideal for apparel sewing and quilting as the motifs are timeless. In selecting the prints for this collection, I made sure to select graphics that would work well for fashion like our new Indygo Essentials pattern line featuring simple, yet sophisticated silhouettes.

Contemporary Kimono

This pattern collection is a dressier kind of casual that embraces minimalism to create elegant, classic styles. Since the patterns are simple by design, it allows the beautifully saturated colors and interesting prints to shine.

Easy Top and Tunic

It’s beautiful in blue with the Boardwalk Dress! This would be a great Spring and Summer go-to and a fun way to pair your favorite prints from the fabric line!

Boardwalk Dress

We love this print in our Fabriflair line of dimensional English paper piecing kits as well. The Radiant Star features 60 pieces, so it’s a great way to showcase every print from this pattern. The Brio Sphere is a wonderful option if you’d like an extraordinarily beautiful way to display embroidery.

Completed Radiant Star

No hoops needed here, we have dimensional art for that! May we suggest fussy cutting some of those butterflies and embroidering them before you stitch them into a sphere? We loved that same embroidery idea shown here, in our Mad Money Mini bag,complete with hand-stitched butterfly love on the front.

Mad money mini

It’s sure to be a conversation piece and a wonderful way to showcase your love of needlecrafts. Or how about lining a Brio Sphere Bowl with the Kyoto Camelia in the Sky color.

Brio Sphere

The options are endless: Clothing and handbags too, as seen here with our Everyday Tank, and our Tribeca Tote.

Tribeca Tote and Everyday Tank

However you use it, we cannot wait to see! It is a gift to send fabric out into the world with RJR fabrics and see what magic all the creative people in our community create with it! Tag me on Instagram @amybarickman_studio when you sew with Kyoto so I can see!

Amy in the Essentials Shift Dress

Here’s me hanging out in my studio with one of my girls. I’m wearing our Indygo Essentials Shift Dress which is a favorite of mine, in the Arbor print in Poppy colorway and she’s wearing our Chic Cowl Neck Shift made with the Butterflies print in Poppy as well. You can see the Mad Money Mini bag in action too! If you’d like to see Kyoto sewn up in several different ways you can visit our Indygo Junction blog post, where we share lots of fun patterns in Kyoto!